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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 15, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt in west london. the desperate search continues to find the missing after the london tower block fire. over 2a hours on from the blaze, 12 people are known to have died. dozens more are still unaccounted for. we don't know if they are alive or dead or if they are in hospital or not. the prime minister promises a full investigation onto the causes of the blaze. on the ground there's anger that warnings may have been ignored. there will have been people trapped in that tower knowing that the people who were supposed to look after them didn't care about them. many spend the night in emergency shelters as the community pull together to support people left without homes and basic needs. good morning.
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it's thursday, 15 june. on breakfast today: we'll bring you the latest on the fire and we'll be asking how such a tragedy could have struck in the heart of the capital. also this morning: reports in the us that the man investigating russia's involvement in the american presidential election is looking at whether president trump attempted to obstruct justice. the days of coming home to a big mobile bill after a european holiday should now be over. from today roaming charges are being dropped across the eu. i'll have all the details shortly. in sport, england's hopes of winning the champions trophy are over. eoin morgan's men were favourites to win the tournament but they were thrashed by pakistan in their semi—final in cardiff by eight wickets. after eight muggy start it will be fresh with a mix of sunshine and showers. i will have a full forecast
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in about 15 minutes. good morning. i'm in west london where almost 30 hours after fire swept through the grenfell tower behind me. it is shocking, the devastation. in the front part you can see some of the front part you can see some of the smoke emerging. you might have seen images last night, it was clear that there were still claims in the building. this morning the search continues for the scores who are still missing. many questions remain but this is what we do know. let's ta ke let's take you through some of the details. police have confirmed 12 people dead so far, but that figure is expected to rise significantly. 3a patients remain in hospital and 18 are in critical care. around the area, many people have tried to help out, giving those
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caught up in this accommodation and shelter and food and we will have more on that later this morning. andy moore has the latest. the official death toll is expected to rise at even so it is outstripped by the number of the missing. these are some of their faces. whole families are unaccounted for. many of them lived on the top floors. this woman was searching local hospitals for herfriend this woman was searching local hospitals for her friend and three children. i don't know if they are alive or dead or if they are in hospital or not. just waiting and hoping. as dusk fell nearly 18 hours after the blaze started there were still pockets of fire in the tower block. the prime minister has promised a full enquiry into why so many lives were lost. of course, once the scene is secure, once the recovery is complete, then investigation will take place into the cause of the fire and if there
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are any lessons to be learned. witnesses say the fire spread rapidly, apparently through the new cladding on the outside of the block installed only last year. this fire expert showed how the foam insulation used in some cladding can catch fire. the actual rigid board installation that i believe is most likely to have been used is made from the same material, polyurethanes. i am now setting fire to this and this is the rate at which it earns. that is very, very rapid and this is a typical material used for insulating external buildings. the firm that carried out the refurbishment said it had met all building control fire regulation and health and safety standards. a later statement removed the section about making fire regulations. the government is sufficiently worried to order checks on any tower blocks that have gone through a similar refurbishment. some residents of
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g re nfell tower refurbishment. some residents of grenfell tower had to resort to ropes made of blankets and sheets to escape the burning building. there are many questions to be answered — why was there system? did the fire alarms work? is the policy the right advice? there are 4000 tower blocks in the uk. this terrible fire will cause a fundamental rethink about the safety of high—rise living. we will address those safety concerns through the programme this morning and try to answer the questions many people have. one of the features of what happened is how quickly the local community and people from further afield volunteered to help. when something as horrific as this happens you either feel despair and hopelessness or you rise above with optimism and a sense of community to come together and support each other. that has been personified
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here by the community. they have really co m e here by the community. they have really come out for each other not just by donating what they have in their homes in terms of food and clothing but also being here for the community to provide the moral and spiritual support. we are here to provide aid, tackling food security and providing help with provisions. blankets and essential resources to support communities — they soon desperately need the support. me and my son went through the whole house, clothes, trainers, shoes, pyjamas, anything i could find that i don't need that sits there i have packed up need that sits there i have packed up and brought down. those people arriving during the early hours of the morning. and i can tell you arriving here today there are —— is so much equipment, supplies and blankets and as we arrived people told me that there we re arrived people told me that there were truckloads arriving in the early hours of the morning and they are kept in storage to help the people who need it most. one of the
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places where people are getting assistance is the westway sports centre. we can go now to our correspondent andy moore. yes, this is one of three reception centres set up last night. it is a giant sports hall and you can see red cross staff. it is a giant sports hall and mattresses have been laid out on the floor to accommodate some people perhaps from grenfell tower block itself but also those people —30 or 40 homes — around the area who were evacuated for fear of the building collapsing or simply because it is too close to grenfell tower. we have seen that huge outpouring of generosity from people and just look at the gifts that have been accumulating here in this sports centre. just down here you can see toothpaste, there are piles of water, there are clothes, and
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people have been coming from all over the country to donate gifts like this. and also you saw in my report about the missing people. look at this. this was left on a car overnight. this is someone searching for marion last seen on the 19th floor with her mother. somebody very concerned about this missing lady. some of these people may have been traced by now. there is still a lot of concern about a lot of people, perhaps dozens of people still missing. thank you very much. we will be investigating those issues around safety concerns. and later on we will speak with the fire service to try to get you the latest in connection with the fatalities and casualties. it is so shocking. look at the smouldering remains. there is still smoke emerging from the building itself. it really is
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shocking when you see it so close, as we are this morning. we will speak with a fire expert later on to address some of the worries people have about the cladding and other issues. for the moment it is back to the studio. thank you, charlie. the met police has set up an emergency number for anyone concerned about friends or family. it is 0800 0961233. the time is known as —— 9:06am. theresa may will meet political parties from northern ireland today at downing street. she'll discuss plans to restore power—sharing at stormont, and try to ally growing concerns about her attempt to secure the backing of democratic unionist mps in parliament. chris mason is our political correspondent. good morning. this news was put on the backburner yesterday, rightly so, because of events in west
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london. the question now is about the talks, how tricky they might be. good morning. yes, there was sent at westminster that the focus rightly shouldn't be here yesterday. nonetheless there are big question is, firstly about the devolved government in northern ireland, then of course the broader context, that was a big issue already, the broader context, the deal struck between the conservatives and the democratic unionist party, which has secured tenancies at westminster in the general election last week. the question that is being asked by sceptics of the deal, which is yet to be signed off, is can a conservative government with the support of the democratic unionist party remain entirely impartial in matters of northern ireland given it will be hooked up with one particular party? today the prime minister is inviting five different parties from northern ireland into
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downing street to discuss the restoration of devolved government with some of them making the argument that they are sceptical about that connection with the democratic unionist party. discussions with the dup as far as matters at westminster are concerned continue. we are yet to find out what the deal amounts to. it could bea what the deal amounts to. it could be a little while before we do. indeed. something else that was timed quite peculiarly was the announcement by tim farron that he is stepping down as leader of the lib dems and now the question is was he pushed or did hejump? lib dems and now the question is was he pushed or did hejump7m lib dems and now the question is was he pushed or did hejump? it is a good question because they're as being pressure on tim farron with questions during the general election campaign which effectively boiled down to how he squared with being a practising christian with leading the party with the word liberal in the title, so there were lots of questions about whether or not he thought gay sex was a scene. in the end after repeated
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questioning in which he ducked giving a straight answer he said no it wasn't. in his resignation yesterday he said he found it impossible to square being a political leader with his religious convictions. as far as the timing is concerned, just a couple of hours before a senior party official, lord patek, said he did not want to continue as home affairs spokesman for the lib dems because of concerns he had over what tim farron had said during the campaign —— lord paddock. i remember speaking with a senior lib dem after tim farron was appointed two years ago who feared that there could be a problem for tim farron growing his religious beliefs with party politics and leadership. in the end that fear then has borne out a couple of years later. there will be a leadership race for the liberal democrats over the summer. we will speak with a lib dem mp later on on that subject.
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thank you for the moment. president trump is being investigated for possible obstruction of justice, according to the washington post. if confirmed, the move by special counsel robert mueller would mark a turning point in the fbi investigation into russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr trump's lawyer has called the leak of information outrageous, inexcusable, and illegal. our north america correspondent david willis sent this report. these latest allegations centre on testimony from the former fbi directorjames comey, the man donald trump unceremoniously sacked just a month ago. he gave evidence to congress saying that while he was director of the fbi mr trump attempted to persuade him to drop the investigation into his former national security advisor michael flynn, a man who was forced to resign after it was revealed that he hadn't been wholly truthful about the extent of his contact with the
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russian ambassador. well, donald trump's lawyer has gone on the attack. he said in a statement the fbi leak of information regarding the president is outrageous, inexcusable and illegal. but the very suggestion that the president of the united states could now be under a criminal enquiry is a significant development in this long—running saga. the ministry of defence says it's investigating an accident involving a tank on the castlemartin firing range in south pembrokeshire. officials believe a number of people have been injured. castlemartin is the only uk army range normally available for direct—fire exercises. the british government needs to do more to improve the well—being of children, according to unicef. the international charity has produced a report examining whether the world's richest countries are meeting internationally—agreed goals for young people. it found that while the uk has made progress dealing with teenage pregnancy and underage drinking, concerns remain over the number of children with poor mental health. the days of coming home
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from a european holiday to a whopping great big mobile phone bill are over. steph can tell us more. good morning. good morning. this is good news for those who like to go abroad to europe and don't want to pay massive bills for your phone. abroad to europe and don't want to pay massive bills for your phonelj turn roaming off so i talk to nobody during it. they are being scrapped for today. whatever the package deal is in the uk, you will get that whichever eu country you are in. sorry, a dodgy cold. it means while you in those countries, you will not be charged more than at home. but if
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you go for data or text—limiting, you go for data or text—limiting, you will be charged. it will be the same as at home. people are saying, cani same as at home. people are saying, can i get a cheap spanish provider and use it in the uk? they have a way around that. it has to be the country you use it in most. it is a home deal. uk news use it abroad and not face extra costs. you are talking to a boss later on. what about them asking for free eu roaming in packages? you have to be more wary of ads. yes, we could see
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ta riffs more wary of ads. yes, we could see tariffs go up to account for them. yes. we will talk to you about that later on the end now for the sport. england are having to get used to not being part of the party. the england cricket captain denied there was any complacency from his side, after they were heavily beaten by pakistan in the champions trophy semi—final. yeah. they went into the match undefeated and as heavy favourites, but were comprehensively outplayed by pakistan who won by eight wickets. they will play either bangladesh or india in sunday's final. the football. southampton have sacked manager claude puel. that's despite the frenchman leading them to the league cup final and securing a respectable eighth place finish in the premier league. puel onlyjoined the saints a year ago. manchester united have confirmed the signing of swedish defender victor lindelof from benfica on a four—year deal. the fee for the 22—year—old is thought to be around £30 million. and it's been confirmed
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that the former boxing world champion at five different weights, floyd mayweather, will take on the ulitmate fighting lightweight champion, conor mcgregor. they'll meet in a bout under normal boxing rules in las vegas on the 26th of august. so, mcgregor will have to rein it in. in ultimate fighting they can do anything. this is boxing. the weather. it has been glorious so far this week. will it continue? we have more summer sunshine in the forecast. a muggy night. through the day, it will turn more fresh. sunshine and scattered showers in some parts of the country as well. today, a cold front working in from the west. a fairly weak front moving
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east but introducing more fresh air coming in off the atlantic. that front brings a band of cloud and drizzly rain in scotland and wales and down towards the south—west of wales first thing edging east across the country for today. any country will have a peter off towards the south—east. scattered showers in the north—west. remaining dry for cornwall, devon as well. not as warm as yesterday. 17—18. pleasant. temperatures in eastern england, 24. it will feel more fresh during the afternoon when the front moves through. northern england. one or two showers breaking through the afternoon. still some sunshine. scotland, the afternoon, scattered showers. some could be quite sharp and heavy with gusting winds at times as well. northern ireland, blustery showers this afternoon. temperatures in the mid— and possibly high teens. in wales, lots
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to come through. one or two showers towards the north. not a bad day to come. showers in northern areas fade away through the evening. largely dry this evening and overnight for many parts of the country. and with that fresh air around, it will be more comfortable. this coming night, lows of around 12—13. five degrees cooler than it is this morning. tomorrow, cloud and outbreaks of rain across parts of western scotla nd rain across parts of western scotland in particular. elsewhere, dry weather coming through the day to borrow. warming up the temperatures on a key upward trend. the weekend. high pressure moves in from the south. we will see warm air coming through saturday. rain for the west and north—west of scotland. elsewhere, a dry day to come. light winds. temperatures on saturday
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likely to reach 28 degrees in sunny spots. even warmer by sunday. there will still be rain in the final plots of scotland. elsewhere, dry. we are likely to see 30 degrees by sunday. for now, it is back to charlie. welcome back. we are in the shadow of the devastating fire at this tower. there is still smoke rising against the blue sky behind it. a shocking scene this morning. what is amazing is all of the people coming down the offer assistance. you can see people bringing water and food. there are huge piles of duvets and
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bla nkets there are huge piles of duvets and blankets people have brought in overnight for those left homeless. graham satchell spend some time with those keen to help. it burned all day. the smoke visible for miles. on the street, people reliving the stuff of nightmares, the horror of seeing peoplejump, seeing them trapped at windows. it was terrible because i saw people at the top floor moving around, screaming for help and before you knew it the fire just engulfed that part. you can imagine what happened. it is terrible. terrible. some of those missing have now been identified including 12—year—old jessica who lived on the 20th floor. we met sophie, 11, one of her school friends. i have a friend called jessica. she is still missing. she was on the news. it is horrible for me to hear that they are missing or dead or in hospital or something. the grief is very public as some received
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terrible news. but with the grief, a truly heartwarming response. everyone seemed to be carrying bags and boxes of water, clothing and bedding. churches, mosques and community centres inundated with people wanting to help. everybody here is a volunteer. none of us know each other. we just got stuck in and it has been fantastic. real community spirit. it has been good. this was a spontaneous response but as the day wore on, a sense of anger that the local authority was nowhere to be seen. it is just the community doing it by themselves. we are co—ordinating it ourselves. there is growing anger as well about the fire, anger that poor people in a council—owned block could have perished and anger that warnings were ignored. i don't care what anyone says. there is no way that that fire should spread that quickly on a newly refurbished building. we went with residents and said that someone needs to look at it.
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david collins says concerns he raised about fire safety at the block were brushed aside. people trapped in a tower knowing that the people who were supposed to look after them did not care about them. are you ok? debris is everywhere on the ground here as questions hang in the air. how could this fire have spread so quickly and why did so many die? those are the questions so many people in the area are asking. graham fieldhouse is a fire—safety expert, and joins me now. good morning. first of all, many people are asking the same question.
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the speed of the fire took off. what are your experts telling you about that? it is unusual. we haven't seen a fire takes hold of the external pa rt a fire takes hold of the external part of a building. when we think about fires, we look at the internal not the external. one of the issues that came out of lakmal was some of the external assisting the fire. enquiries were made into that and reports were done. we have another enquiry. we want one that will put things forward that are helpful for the future so we don't have to go through interviews like this again. we need a full enquiry to determine what people knew about the product put in. what specification was for
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the product? what about the people looking at the certification? what was specified to be put in the property? and the fire doors! one of the interviews yesterday said the corridors were very quickly smoke—locked. can i just corridors were very quickly smoke—locked. can ijust tell the viewers, but there is a lot of debris around. it is really flaky and charred. it is probably the clagging. it will be interesting to find out. this clearly burned in the ferocious fire. it is worth saying
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even as we are standing here there isa even as we are standing here there is a fine layer of dust. you cannot see it in the air but it is definitely there. we will be here all morning. for now, though, the news, travel, and weather wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. dozens of families in west london have spent the night sleeping in temporary accommodation or shelters, that have been opened up after a massive fire in a 24—storey tower. the blaze ripped through grenfell tower killing and injuring many. there are still dozens of people unaccounted for. 12 are known to have died. many homes in the surrounding roads were evacuated as a precaution. many residents left there homes with nothing. iam very i am very fortunate to have been able to pick up my kids and run for my life. something is going on. we don't know. people in the building,
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i have heard some are dead. i have heard phone calls saying they are going to hospital. we don't know what is going on. following the fire, several local councils have launched safety reviews. kensington and chelsea have asked its health and chelsea have asked its health and safety advisers to carry out checks on its housing. in enfield, officials are organising a precautionary inspection of tower blocks and residents are being reminded what to do in the event of a fire. and the tube. the northern line has
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no service. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. another warm day of weather ahead. more in the way of cloud. sunny spells for a time. a very mild start to the day. lots of sunshine through the morning. into the afternoon, more cloud developing from the west. spots of rain. a week cold front coming through. as we go through the evening, more fresh. temperatures through the day, 24— 26, possibly. sunshine around this evening. the sun will set at 20 past nine. more comfortable for sleeping during the night. it will be fresh. 13-14.
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during the night. it will be fresh. 13—14. tomorrow, again, set to stay dry. more cloud around. sunny spells through the day. temperatures quite high, 23- through the day. temperatures quite high, 23— 24. and they are set to climb again through the weekend. it will be warm, even hot. 28— 30 on saturday and on sunday. before we go, a number to call if you are worried about loved ones. 0800 0961233. that is for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. good morning. i'm in west london, where more than 24 hours after fire swept through the grenfell tower behind me, you can still see smoke and it is interesting, you can see a
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little more smoke emerging from this side of the building but it is really shocking to see the remains of the 27 story building behind me. let's ta ke of the 27 story building behind me. let's take you through the details of what's happening this morning. police have confirmed 12 people dead so far, but that figure is expected to rise significantly. in terms of those getting at tension and care: 34 patients remain in hospital and 18 are in critical care. many families from the grenfell tower and surrounding buildings have spent the night in emergency accommodation set up in local community centres. when something as horrific as this happens, you either feel despair at and hopelessness or you rise above with optimism and positivity to support each other. that has been personified
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here by the community. they have really come out for each other notjust by donating what they have in their homes in terms of food and clothing but also being here for the community to provide the moral and spiritual support. we are here to provide aid, tackling food security and providing help with provisions, blankets and essential resources to support communities that so desperately need the support. me and my son went through the whole house, clothes, trainers, shoes, pyjamas, anything i could find that i don't need that sits there i have bagged up and brought down. this is a tightly packed residential area and wherever you go people have left signs saying help yourself, there is water and other supplies as well. alongside the very real anger is emerging more and more. many people have come along to help those families who are without a home
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temporarily. andy moore is at the westway sport centre just a short distance from where we are now, where some of those people are being helped. yes, hello, we are underneath the westway, the road above us, and we are at this basketball court, together with donations, these bags given to people who have lost everything, they are just here and they are being sorted out into various piles that might be useful for the various people. so, we can see over the back some girls clothes, then it would come around over here there are children's toys, over the far side, and then you can see all of these shoes, this is just and then you can see all of these shoes, this isjust an example and then you can see all of these shoes, this is just an example of the generosity that people are bringing along, these gifts for people who have lost their homes and everything in them. some of those people have stayed in the sports centre over the back, a huge sports hall where mattresses were laid out
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on the floor and we understand quite a few people were saying their overnight. some of them were from the tower block itself, others were from the homes around that had been evacuated because of the danger, because they were too close to g re nfell tower because they were too close to grenfell tower and there are three emergency centres we understand that have been set up. i talked earlier on about people who are missing. we have seen notices posted up with photos of various people put on ca rs. photos of various people put on cars. a lot of people posting these notices trying to find loved ones and it seems dozens are missing and unaccounted for. thanks very much for that. we will be spending more time with volunteers and those involved in the process. so many people coming down. we were told there were people arriving in the early hours of the morning with truckloads of materials to try to help people. more of that later and
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we have the latest updates from the fire service about the casualties and fire service about the casualties a nd exa ctly fire service about the casualties and exactly what the situation is with the building itself as we can see. this morning there is still smoke emerging and late last night in the darkness you could still see the flames and we will have an update a little later on but for the moment it is back to the studio. thank you. the met police has set up an emergency number for anyone concerned about friends or family. it is 0800-0961-233. that's 0800-0961-233. there is other news to bring you: theresa may will meet political parties from northern ireland today at downing street. she'll discuss plans to restore power—sharing at stormont, and try to allay growing concerns about her attempt to secure the backing of democratic unionist mps in parliament. meanwhile, tim farron says he is
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stepping down as leader of the liberal democrats because he feels torn between his christian faith and his political duties. during the campaign he was repeatedly asked about his views on homosexuality. mr farron will stay on as leader until parliament goes into recess next month. president trump is being investigated for possible obstruction of justice, according to the washington post. if confirmed, the move by special counsel robert mueller would mark a turning point in the fbi investigation into russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr trump's lawyer has called the leak of information outrageous, inexcusable and illegal. those are the top stories for you and we will keep you up—to—date with the fire at grenfell tower in west london through the morning. it is time to turn to the sport with mike, and not a great result to begin with. congratulations to pakistani. great result for pakistan. and it could be pakistan— india a game.
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they could play in the final —— again. a lot of head scratching for england as they have been building up england as they have been building up to the tournament for two years, strong favourites to get to the final at least. what happened? in cricket, there is a fine line between success and failure. it can ta ke between success and failure. it can take just between success and failure. it can takejust a between success and failure. it can take just a couple of overs and the momentum changes. and the batsmen didn't perform too. were they complacent? england's cricketers are out of the champions trophy, after a crushing defeat to pakistan in their semi—final. eoin morgan's side had been the favourite for the tournament, but struggled on a slow pitch in cardiff. jonny bairstow, who came into the side, hit 43, but wickets tumbled quickly, including ben stokes, who went for 34, without hitting a single boundary. england made just 211, which pakistan knocked off in less than 38 overs. they play either india or bangladesh in sunday's final at the oval. morgan denied his team had been complacent.
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we played against some really good sides the recently and we have managed to beat them. that hasn't gone into our heads at all. in today's gang, going in knowing we would play on a used cricket brought pakistan's gang closer to home —— game. southampton are looking for a new manager, after sacking claude puel last night. the frenchman had spent just one season at st mary's, but during that time guided the saints to the league cup final, where they were narrowly beaten by manchester united, and he helped them to finish a respectable eighth in the premier league. it's been confirmed that the former boxing world champion at five different weights, floyd mayweather, will fight the ultimate fighting lightweight champion conor mcgregor. they will meet in a bout in las vegas on the 26th of august. 40—year—old mayweather retired undefeated after winning his 49th straight bout in september 2015, while the 29—year—old
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irishman mcgregor is the first fighter in the ufc to have held two belts but has never boxed professionally. the contest will take place under normal boxing rules so mcgregor will have to limit himself to the noble art ofjust punching. no kicking all getting on the floor, he will just no kicking all getting on the floor, he willjust have to stick to punching. warren gatland has named lions team for saturday's warm—up game and says he's going to keep the all blacks guessing ahead of their first test next weekend. johnny sexton has been preferred to owen farrell at fly half for the lions‘ clash with the maori all blacks in rotorua. the us open golf gets under way in wisconsin this afternoon. much of the pre—tournament talk has been about the punishing rough, with long grass surrounding many of the fairways.
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organisers took the unusual step of cutting some of it back, much to rory mcilroy‘s surprise. we have 60 yards from left alone to write line — you have got 156 players of the best in the world, if we can't hit it in that avenue we may as well pack our bags and go home —— right. at no, the us open, supposed to be a tough test and guy leigh can't play within a 50 yard zone, i don't think they have much to complain about. for most players are ruffled, up to their knees but for me i would struggle to see over the top. their knees but for me i would struggle to see over the topm would be over our shoulders, wouldn't it? and the longest course in us open history. it will be fun to watch. i think so. you. sarah will bring you up—to—date with the
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weather for the week ahead shortly. we now know that at least 12 people have died as a result of the fire in granfell tower. the cause remains unknown but questions are already being asked about how this could have happened. in 2009 three women and three children were killed in a fire in a tower block in south london. southwark council pleaded guilty to four charges relating to safety breaches and lessons were supposed to have been learnt. so, were they? professor kurt barling is a journalist who investigated the southwark fire almost eight years ago, and joins me from our london studio. thank you forjoining us. can you remind us what happened the lakanal house fire in 2009? it was a terrible incident at lakanal house, as you said. six people died. it was as you said. six people died. it was a fire which took over effectively a whole block in south london. of course, there were many lessons at
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the time that were said to be learnt. let me run you through a list of what the inquest into the fire said in 2013 in terms of the main questions that needed to be addressed. why the fire spread so quickly, should there have been alarmed and sprinklers, did renovation affect safety, was the advice to stay put right and what we re advice to stay put right and what were the implications for other buildings? what is tragic today is that exactly the same questions are being asked about this fire yesterday. frankly, it can be described as nothing short of a national scandal that this has been allowed to happen again. after an inquest which looked at so much evidence over 11 weeks in 2013 in lakanal house, evidence over 11 weeks in 2013 in la ka nal house, nothing evidence over 11 weeks in 2013 in lakanal house, nothing short of a public enquiry will get to the problem of what the problem is with these tower blocks and keeping people safe. there has been a report in plan in government to look at the safety issues, to look at where the
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sprinklers should be put in place, to look at how when a fire takes place, it should be contained. why hasn't this moved on, why haven't we seen developments? there are lots of people in the fire safety business who say that the department of communities and the government have dragged theirfeet. it communities and the government have dragged their feet. it has to be said, four years on from a really important inquest into a really tragic fire in which six people lost their lives, the same questions being asked — people are right to ask why nothing has been done substantially to ask why nothing has been done su bsta ntially to prevent ask why nothing has been done substantially to prevent this happening again. you see, we have all seen, pictures of the fire yesterday. we have seen how quickly the fire spread. on the 10pm news last night you could still see the glowing fire. that is 22 hours after the fire started. you have to ask yourself the question, the public authorities have a principal
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responsibility to protect life, to protect the citizen. clearly this building has failed and the systems put in place to prevent fire in tower blocks has failed too. the evidence is there for all of us to see. the time for talking is over. the time for action has started. thank you very much forjoining us this morning on breakfast. the time now is coming up to 6:45am and of course the grenfell tower fire is the top story this morning and the search continues for dozens of missing people after the london tower block fire which has so far claimed 12 lives. and anger is growing over whether safety concerns we re growing over whether safety concerns were ignored. the prime minister has promised a full investigation into why the blaze spread so quickly. we are in west london keeping you
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up—to—date on that all day. bye for now, the weather. is the warm weather going to last? yes. it will turn hot. for today, after the muggy start, more fresh. a respite in heat and humidity. a fresh feel developing with sunshine and scattered showers. fresh weather will be drawn in by this weather front heading in from the west. that is introducing that atlantic in it. scattered showers. this band of cloud is going east across much of the country. rainfall disappearing by the time it gets to eastern england. by this afternoon, sunshine
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and some of us will see scattered showers. remaining dry across the south—west of england. not as warm as yesterday. a pleasant day. 17—18. temperatures around 24 in east anglia and the south—east. more fresh and less humid during the afternoon with sunshine. scattered showers developing in parts of northern england, especially the north—west. scotland as well. frequent showers by this afternoon. sunshine in between. the odd sharp shower and thunder around. show northern ireland will be heavy at times and blustery as well with gusty winds. equally, dry weather. wales. showers in the north. much of wales. showers in the north. much of wales a king dry and bright. —— looking. showers easing the way for a time to be showery rain continuing in the far north—west overnight. more dry and comfortable for
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sleeping. overnight, temperatures down to 12 — 14. five degrees lower than this morning first thing. the next morning, dry and settled. outbreaks of rain in northern ireland initially entered the scotla nd ireland initially entered the scotland as well. elsewhere, dry and fine. 23— 24. high pressure holding on through friday night and the weekend. that sets the scene for a warm and largely dry weekend. blustery winds in the north. elsewhere, warm and dry up 28 degrees on saturday. sunday, wet weather in the far north—west. elsewhere, dry and pretty hot. by the time it hits sunday, it could be dirty degrees. those are colossal temperatures! —— 30 degrees. the days of bringing back a massive mobile bill from a european holiday should now be over.
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from today roaming charges are being dropped across the eu. steph's got all the details. this is good news for anyone who wa nts to this is good news for anyone who wants to use their phone abroad but is worried about costs in the eu. that's right. new rules come into force today which mean if you travel to an eu country and use your mobile phone you'll be charged the same as if you were here in the uk. and you won't be hit with extra charges for making calls, sending texts, or using data on—line, as long as it's in your plan you have in the uk. these new rules have been a long time in the making, after years of complaints that customers have been getting ripped off by extra charges. dave dysone is the chief executive of the mobile network, three. good morning to you. good morning. what are the caveats? today is a big day for everyone, including mobile operators. they have been told they are not allowed to charge anything
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extra when customers travel to the eu and destinations within it. it is as simple as that. there are questions being raised in terms of the surrounding area, like norway. there is a little bit of confusion in terms of what is included and what not. broadly in terms of what is included and whatnot. broadly speaking, it is good for consumers. it allows them to use their phone as if it is in the uk. many people have it as the first thing they look at in the morning in the last thing before bed. and this is something you brought in. you abolished extra roaming charges in several countries several years ago. have you had to increase tariffs? you have lost revenue. we have not. we have offered this for a long time. the approach to this has been first of
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all research where customers travel overseas the most. we talked to overseas the most. we talked to overseas operators whose networks customers go to. we negotiate prices and pass those on to customers. right now, we have 60 destinations that are included including europe and countries outside of it, popular destinations like the usa, singapore, australia, new zealand. that means we don't have to put prices up. you did put prices up by 2.6% in may. that is in line with the rp! measure of inflation. that measure of inflation has been discredited recently with people saying the cpi is better. that is lower, 1.8%. why did you use the higher one? it is referenced in the terms and conditions. we stuck with
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what people were being charged. we we re what people were being charged. we were set for the previous five—year period. it was effectively applying what we said we would do. otherwise it would be more confusing for customers. security as well. your network has experienced problems with cyber security. a couple of months ago, there was a fresh data breach. people going on the accounts had call histories and names of strangers. this is an issue for eve ryo ne strangers. this is an issue for everyone we are investing a lot of time and effort to make sure we protect customers' information the way they want. it is a complex issue. but one that is increasingly
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important. i understand that from talking to other ceos. everyone is investing the right time and attention to making sure we keep them safe. thank you for your time. the ceo of three. over the last few months on bbc breakfast we've had to report some harrowing news, including yesterday's fire at grenfell tower block in west london. of course, we will continue coverage of that. but we also wanted to bring you something else this morning. it's a story that might bring a smile to your face. as part of the bbc‘s music day, we wanted to show you one project that's making a difference to hospital patients and the medical staff looking after them. our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been to take a look. this is not how a hospital high dependency unit normally sounds. but at the manchester royal infirmary,
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it is becoming a regular event. since lastjuly, professional musicians have been brought into play for patients. and it is easy to see the sheer joy play for patients. and it is easy to see the sheerjoy it brings.|j play for patients. and it is easy to see the sheerjoy it brings. i found myself in an intensive care unit, andi myself in an intensive care unit, and i found that experience quite traumatising. it was the idea of helen especially taylor. she had only a tv set. i felt alive again. it was transformative. i did not think about my condition, i did not feel any pain. it was quite incredible how they helped me. it was all i could talk about when i left the hospital. already a volunteer for left the hospital. already a volunteerfor music left the hospital. already a volunteer for music in hospitals, she decided to set up icuhere, to
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ta ke she decided to set up icuhere, to take music into intensive care units. it has proven a big hit. take music into intensive care units. it has proven a big hitm is soothing. it is good for you. units. it has proven a big hitm is soothing. it is good for youm is soothing. it is good for youm is making a difference.” is soothing. it is good for youm is making a difference. i don't want to stereotype you, but you are a motorcycle rider and you have tattoos, do you like hard rock? no. and the staff approved of the musical companies. it is relaxing and helps. the day after terror attacks, she helped out in the way she could, by playing in intensive care. i know this can be quite
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settling for the staff. sometimes they come it is they need. i come in if it is appropriate. one of the nurses said it was a horrible week and it is just what they needed. and one patientjacqueline, and it is just what they needed. and one patient jacqueline, told and it is just what they needed. and one patientjacqueline, told me having music played by her bedside and make her holds a better. to me, music is really good for healing. —— her whole day better. how powerful is music? it can move mountains and change hearts. and it can do wonders. colin paterson, bbc news, manchester royal infirmary. colin there, hearing about the power of music as part of bbc music day. you can find out more about events that are happening where you live at bbc.co.uk/music day.
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time now to get the news, travel, and weather, where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the search continues this morning for the many londoners who are still missing following a devastating fire at the grenfell tower in kensington. 12 people are known to have died, but the death toll is expected to rise. dozens of families have spent the night sleeping in temporary accommodation or shelters— some who were evacuated from neighbouring properties. many left their homes with nothing. i am very fortunate to have been able to pick up my kids and run for my life. these people, we don't know their
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situation at the moment. something is going on. we don't know. people in the building, i have heard some are dead. i have heard phone calls saying they are going to hospital. we don't know what is going on. well, following the fire, several local councils have launched safety reviews. kensington and chelsea has asked its health and safety advisors to carry out checks on its housing. in enfield, officials say they're arranging a precautionary inspection of all tower blocks. and residents living in high—rise buildings in other parts of london are being reminded of what to do in the event of a fire. there are still some roadblocks. westway is now open. the a12 is down to one lane north—bound. the northern line has no service
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between morden, and severe delays. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. another warm day of weather ahead. temperatures not as warm as yesterday. more in the way of cloud. sunny spells for a time. a very mild start to the day. lots of sunshine through the morning. into the afternoon, more cloud developing from the west. a few spots of rain. a weak cold front coming through. it won't amount to anything at all. as we go through the evening, more fresh. temperatures through the day, 24—26, possibly. sunshine around this evening. the sun will set at 20 past nine. more comfortable for sleeping during the night. it will be fresh. 13-14.
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tomorrow, again, set to stay dry. perhaps a little bit more cloud around. more like sunny spells through the day. temperatures quite high, 23—24. and they are set to climb again through the weekend. in fact, it will feel very warm, even hot. 28— 30 on saturday and on sunday. before we go, a number to call if you are worried about loved ones. 0800 0961233. that is for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt in west london.
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the desperate search continues to find the missing after the london tower block fire. over 24 hours on from the blaze, 12 people are known to have died. scores more are still unaccounted for. we don't know if they are alive or dead or if they are in hospital or not. the prime minister promises a full investigation onto the causes of the blaze. on the ground there's anger that warnings may have been ignored. there will have been people trapped in that tower knowing that the people who were supposed to look after them didn't care about them. many spend the night in emergency shelters, as the community pull together to support people left without homes and basic needs. good morning.
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it's thursday, june 15. on breakfast today: we'll bring you the latest on the fire and we'll of the capital. also this morning: liberal democrat leader tim farron steps down from the post saying he's "torn" between his christian faith and his political duties. we'll speak to one of his colleagues. the days of coming home to a big mobile bill after a european holiday should now be over. from today, roaming charges are being dropped across the eu. i'll have all the details shortly. in sport, england's hopes of winning the champions trophy are over. eoin morgan's men were favourites to win the tournament but they were thrashed by pakistan in their semi—final in cardiff by eight wickets. and carol has the weather. —— sarah.
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it will be fresh with a mix of sunshine and showers. i will have a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. i'm in west london where 30 hours after fire swept through the grenfell tower behind me, you can still see smoke rising from the building and the fire services at work around the remains. and there is no escaping how shocking the image is of the charred remains of the 24 story building and let me take you through the latest information we have in terms of the fatalities and casualties. police have confirmed 12 people dead so far, but that figure is expected to rise significantly. in terms of the casualties: 34 patients remain in hospital and 18 are in critical care. now, what we know locally is so many
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people have gathered around to bring help and offer accommodation and shelter to those who have been caught up in this. andy moore has the latest. the official death toll is expected to rise, but even so its outstripped by the number of the missing. these are some of their faces. whole families are unaccounted for. many of them lived on the top floors. this woman was searching local hospitals for herfriend and three children. i don't know if they're alive or dead or if they're in hospital or not. we haven't any clue. just waiting and hoping. as dusk fell nearly 18 hours after the blaze started, there were still pockets of fire inside the tower block. the prime minister has promised there would be a full enquiry into why so many lives were lost. of course, once the scene is secure, once the recovery is complete, then an investigation will take place into the cause of the fire and if there are any lessons to be learned.
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oh my god, they're screaming! witnesses say the fire spread rapidly, apparently through the new cladding on the outside of the block installed only last year. this fire expert showed how the foam insulation used in some cladding can catch fire. the actual rigid—board installation that i believe is most likely to have been used is made from the same material, polyurethane. i'm now setting fire to this and this is the rate at which it burns. that is very, very rapid and this is a typical material used for insulating external buildings. the firm that carried out the refurbishment said it had met all building control fire regulation and health and safety standards. a later statement removed the section about meeting fire regulations. the government is sufficiently worried to order checks on any tower blocks that have gone through a similar refurbishment. some residents of grenfell tower had to resort to ropes made of blankets and sheets to escape
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the burning building. there are many questions to be answered: why wasn't there a sprinkler system? did the fire alarms work? is the statehood policy the right advice? there are 4000 tower blocks in the uk. this terrible fire will cause a fundamental rethink about the safety of high—rise living. later on, we will be discussing some of those questions that have been asked and it is definitely true that there is a growing sense of anger locally about how this building was built and we will be addressing some of those issues later on but walking around here, as you walk around the busy buildup area, everywhere you walk you see little signs on walls offering people assistance, bottles offering people assistance, bottles of water, please yourself. just around the corner from where we are
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is the westway sport centre, that is where many families are being helped and andy is here for us now. yes, good morning, charlie. iam actually on a basketball court that has been turned into a clearing space for some of the donations. just look over my shoulder. lots of clothing, women's clothing has been piled up and sorted out, and on the other side of defence you can see hundreds of water bottles that have been provided. —— defence. a huge outpouring of generosity. one of them is this man from the sikh welfare — what have you been able to do? we came here early in the day yesterday, we brought a van full of water, clothing, food, and other essentials that we thought we needed here, so we were here yesterday with volunteers. what made you come down? it is on our doorstep and when
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something like this happens, you wa nt to something like this happens, you want to see if you can do anything. when we came, there was mayhem, people running around trying to get anything they can to find out — you know, they are putting up people's names that they have lost, has anyone seen them, so if we could help one person it is a different. as we look around we can see piles of donations — what is needed now, is more still needed?” of donations — what is needed now, is more still needed? i don't think we need more clothing, i think we need more essentials. i think first of all we need to try to rehouse these people. there are empty houses in london. there must be somewhere to rehouse these people. once all of this razzmatazz is finished, that is when the work will start. where are people going to go after this? they have lost people, people have died, so they need to start trying to rebuild this life that they have lost. thank you very much. the message perhaps an off donations,
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cash donations might be more useful now. charlie. thank you very much. so, we will pick up on some of those issues many locally are raising, the safety issues on the cladding and about how the fire spread, we will speak with a chartered surveyor, someone who knows the building well. and we will speak with the fire service to update everyone on the situation, including the fire officers who were involved in the heroics as they tried to get people out of the blaze. for the moment, though, from here it is back to the studio. thank you. the met police has set up an emergency number for anyone concerned about friends or family. it is 0800-0961-233. that's 0800-0961-233. more from charlie to come. let's get some reaction from westminster on the tragic events in west london. our political correspondent chris masonjoins us. unsurprisingly, there are questions
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about safety now being asked. labour is asking the questions, we are asking these questions. what is the governments reaction to this? the striking things politically about this is that yet again politics had to pause yesterday, yet again politicians have been reflecting on the incredible work of the emergency services. and then of course the question to come in the direction of westminster and political leaders about what they have done up until now and what they can do in the future. so there was agreement as you would expect from politicians about the scale of the horror and how horrendous that was, and also the work of the emergency services. and thenjeremy corbyn, the labour leader, pressing specifically on funding for local government, and whether cutbacks in funding may have
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had... may have been a contributing factor. the other question on the specifics relates to a review of regulations into fire safety that was promised by the government, in fa ct, was promised by the government, in fact, promised by the man who is now the chief of staff to the prime minister, gavin barwell, a former housing minister. there have been suggestions from somebody doesn't come along because the government was keen on cutting back on regulations and red tape rather than adding to them. the line from the government department responsible, the department for communities and local government, is they are still looking at the review of existing regulations. there has been no attempt to prevent them from being published. those questions remain and we will talk about that later on as well on breakfast. there is politics going on as well. there is a government to be formed by theresa may in terms of a majority government. and there has been a resignation? yes, so, plenty of
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politics, something of a pause button for obvious reasons yesterday, though not entirely, given what went on last week in the general election. what is happening todayis general election. what is happening today is the prime minister is inviting in five political parties from northern ireland, all of this trying to ensure that devolved government can return to northern ireland after the collapse of that earlier this year. that is a big deal of itself but it is complicated by the fact that the conservatives are also talking to northern ireland's uup about a deal to ensure theresa may can be propped up in downing street —— dup. and some feel that deal cannot mean the government can be impartial about matters relating to northern ireland. and tim farron, leader of the lib dems, is resigning. he says he doesn't feel that he can combine his committed christianity with leading the liberal democrats. lots of
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difficult questions for him on that during the campaign and the liberal democrats didn't make a vast amount of progress in the general election either. he will stand down in month and there will be a leadership race over the summer. thank you very much for the moment. president trump is being investigated for possible obstruction of justice, according to the washington post. if confirmed, the move by special counsel robert mueller would mark a turning point in the fbi investigation into russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr trump's lawyer has called the leak of information "outrageous, inexcusable, and illegal." the ministry of defence says it's investigating an accident involving a tank on the castlemartin firing range in south pembrokeshire. officials believe a number of people have been injured. castlemartin is the only uk army range normally available for direct—fire exercises. there's good news for mobile phone users, —— the bank of england is deciding
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today on whether to raise interest rates. will it follow the footsteps in the us? we have been talking for yea rs in the us? we have been talking for years about how low interest rates have been and so what you have is a group of economists from monetary policy committee who will meet monthly and look at what's going on in the economy and work out whether they need to increase or decrease they need to increase or decrease the bank base rate in order to change how much we pay for when we borrow money and when we save money. for a long time now it has been at 0.25% since last year but for a long time you're looking at least eight yea rs time you're looking at least eight years that it has been historically low, whereas if you compare that to america they have put up interest rates and that is because they feel quite confident about how the economy is going. they think things are picking up so they should increase interest rates. it is the rate that they have at the moment thatis rate that they have at the moment that is between 1% and 1.25%. this
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is the second time they have done that recently and they expect to do it before christmas, so people are wondering if we will do it too? it is unlikely because our economy, economists feel, it isn't as strong. it is an interesting point because we often look to america to look what difference it will make for us. interesting that the economies are so diverging in some sense. thank you. —— diverted. there's good news for mobile phone users, a european union law to abolish roaming charges for people using mobile phones abroad comes into force today. the new rules mean that citizens travelling within the eu will be able to call, text and browse the internet on mobile devices at the same price they pay at home. but consumer group "which?" warns phone users could face "unexpected charges" if they exceed their plan allowances. questions are being asked about how
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the grenfell tower fire became so devastating so quickly. we have been told it broke out on the fourth floor but we don't know the cause. people were told it should be contained and it did not. it raises the question, how did it spread so quickly? some have pointed to the cladding on the outside of the building, but the fire protection agency says when it is properly fitted, it had actually resist fire. there are also questions about how it was fitted. it did not have a sprinkler system as it was built in 1974. there are no legal requirement for them. so, was the advice to stay put correct? biosafety specialists
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have told us you need to keep escape routes free of smoke. however, it spread quickly into the escape routes. how have other buildings been affected? it is not the first. in 2009, six people died and apartment block caught fire in southwark. we can talk to the chair ofa southwark. we can talk to the chair of a fire safety rescue group. thank you forjoining me this morning. what do you think went wrong with yellow this is the most terrible tragedy. my heart goes out to those affected. it is the wrong time for me to point the finger of blame. but our committee was wise before, not
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after, the event, and have argued time after time sprinklers need to be installed. there should never have happened. the coroner in 2013 said after the lakanal have happened. the coroner in 2013 said after the la ka nal disaster, sprinklers should be fitted retrospectively. also, we have waited 11 years for these regulations. the housing minister at the time, gavin barwell, now theresa may's chief of staff, he was in charge. have you heard anything from him? these changes did not happen under his watch. well, it is too early to say precisely what has gone on year. you have only got to look to see we have made countless speeches that sprinklers should be fitted. it is absolutely madness that it
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fitted. it is absolutely madness thatitis fitted. it is absolutely madness that it is not mandatory. it is impossible to put any amount of money on someone's life. it isn't just this minister or the one before him. it has been very frustrating for our committee. it has taken a tragedy like this to get some attention on the whole issue of sprinklers. i am delighted there will be a proper audit of the 4000 tower blocks. local authorities and housing associations must immediately make sure all tower blocks have proper safety precautions in place. you have to be delighted after something like this has had to happen and something like this has happened under a conservative government which you are saying has not committed to the recommendations, safety recommendations, safety recommendations, of the people of this country. well, these recommendations go back to not this government, not the one before, but the one before that. but it is your
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government that has not reacted to a report in 2013. i apologise for interrupting. it is well to look back, but you have been in charge since 2010. this happened in 2017 in a city dwelling after a report four yea rs a city dwelling after a report four years ago has not been put in place. time after time having meetings with officials i think they have been drawn on the fact that the number of deaths have dramatically declined as a result of fires. we warned them something like this would happen. i simply don't understand why no action was taken. i think in time we will get a proper explanation exactly why the decision was taken so long ago not to immediately make sure that local authorities were given the option of retrospectively fitting sprinklers. but i think at the moment i don't want to make
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matters worse as far as families are concerned. i think we have to wait until there is a full investigation and we do all we possibly can to support the families who are now in absolute despair and still looking for their loved ones. one can only imagine for those families, yes, the situation cannot be made worse because they have lost loved ones, homes, everything. why are our question is not being made to the former housing minister, gavin ba rwell, former housing minister, gavin barwell, the chief of staff, who has the ear of theresa may. why has he not said anything? have you talked to him? why has he had such in action? of course, parliament has not got together yet. we don't even have a government at the moment. mr speaker announced to the house yesterday that the new minister, nick heard, was available to discuss the problem with colleagues. she made the immediate announcement she
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would do everything she can to help the families. i am of no doubt at all that as a matter of urgency, the end her team are trying to get to the bottom of what has happened. —— the bottom of what has happened. —— the prime minister and her team. but i don't want to point the finger at anyone. i want to say this is awful and has taken a tragedy to get attention on this issue, that sprinklers save lives and you cannot put any price on someone's life. thank you. chairman of the fire safety group. and now for the weather. quite a warm and muggy start to the day. through the day, some respite from the heat and humidity. feeling quite fresh, especially in the west. sunshine and showers today. the
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fresh feel is down to the fact we have a cold front working eased through the day allowing fresh air from the atlantic. that front is bringing a band of cloud with drizzly rain going east. much of it disappearing by east anglia and the south—east late in the day. sunny spells for many of us to be showers in the north—west of the country. remaining dry. sunshine for the south—west of england and the south coast. temperature is not as warm as they were yesterday. 17—18 the south—west. heading our way further north, more cloud in the midlands and northern england, the chance of the odd shower developing in the afternoon. more showers in scotland. some in the heavy side. the odd rumble of thunder mixed in. sunshine between those blustery showers. gusty winds for a time across northern ireland. feeling fresh. sunny spells and scattered showers.
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some showers in the north of wales. much of wales, a dry picture in the afternoon. this evening. showers in the north go away. largely dry overnight. not as hot and muggy as recent nights. first thing tomorrow, temperatures, 12—13. five degrees more cool than the date. through tomorrow, largely dry through the country. cloudy in the north—west. moving to scotland through the day. england and wales in that sunshine, feeling quite pleasant. temperatures up feeling quite pleasant. temperatures up to 23 degrees or so. the weekend. high pressure keeping hold of the weather, moving in from the south. weather fronts in the north—west. rain on saturday in the north and west of scotland. elsewhere, dry, warm, 28 degrees or so to be warming up warm, 28 degrees or so to be warming up even warm, 28 degrees or so to be warming up even more. warm, 28 degrees or so to be warming up even more. 30 degrees by sunday. back to charlie in west london now.
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we are in the shower of grenfell tower. you can see it over my shoulder. interesting to hear about moment ago. in london, there are something like 700 tower blocks above 11 storeys. many people are asking questions about safety. we are talking about how people are being looked after. the reverend mark o'donoghue is the area dean of kensington and has been organising volunteers helping some of those who escaped the fire who are taking shelter at st celment‘s church. and sophie duncan is a local resident who lives close by who had to evacuate her home. as soon as you step into this area it is obvious the lengths people are going to help one another. in a terrible situation, there is something to cling on to. since 330 yesterday morning, churches were opening doors all around. they were doing
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whatjesus christ would do, opening doors and giving people some want to talk to and pray with, providing food and water and shelter and just providing somewhere to go into away from the chaos. in these desperate hours with the missing, with those not certain what has happened to loved ones, what can you offer them? christ—like compassion. someone to listen to their story. i met a chap, he spent the entire day going centre to centre looking for his family. he had been so busy he did not stop all day. i asked had been so busy he did not stop all day. iasked if had been so busy he did not stop all day. i asked if it would help if i prayed with him. he was grateful for that. has been resolved? we have not yet heard. i hope he finds his two
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friends. i hope they are safe and well. but he is still looking. in among the compassion, a lot of anger as well. that is focusing on specific decisions about the building we can see still smouldering behind us, the cladding, the reason why it spread so quickly. what can you tell us? earlier on today we saw stuff everywhere. this is quite likely to be from the external cladding of the building. they will have to be an enquiry to look at it quite candid camera look down on the street to my right? —— can the. what is that? this is probably the installation from behind the cladding. the bre, the
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british research establishment, will look into this to see if it was of suitable quality for fires. was it the correct thing specified? and was it what should have gone into the house? and many people are talking about the advice for those caught up in the crisis. those upper floors, whether they had to stay or leave. there is some advice given that tends to be given. evacuate, properties that are alarmed, ones not purpose—built. but in a purpose—built block like this, they are told to stay put. but, the true advice is to stay put unless you are affected by fire and smoke. they were. they should have been evacuated. there needs to be clarification to say stay put simply
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means a small fire on a flatter the 10th floor does not mean all 12 — 20 -30 10th floor does not mean all 12 — 20 — 30 floors have to be evacuated. thank you for your time and thank you for spending time with us this morning. we will be following up on the fire service a little later on. they will give us the latest information they have. it is worth saying, we were talking about the compassion of the local area, there isa compassion of the local area, there is a remembrance wall being started. it is very moving. some personal m essa g es it is very moving. some personal messages on the wall. for now, i will hand you to the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the search continues this morning for those many people still missing following a fire in the grenfell
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tower in kensington. there are still dozens of people unaccounted for. 12 are known to have died. many homes in the surrounding roads were evacuated as a precaution. many residents left there homes with nothing. dozens of families in west london have spent the night sleeping in temporary accommodation or shelters, that have been opened up after a massive fire in a 24—storey tower. the response of the local community has been absolutely incredible. i am in the community church. this behind me is what was delivered when the church closed last night. there is food, everything you can imagine. toys, toothpaste. lots of toothbrushes. children's toys. it is an amazing response from londoners. following the fire, several local councils have launched safety reviews. kensington and chelsea have asked its health and safety advisers to carry out checks on its housing. in enfield, officials are organising a precautionary inspection of tower blocks and residents are being reminded what to do in the event of a fire. the travel.
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in blackheath, there's been an accident. down to one lane. the northern lights has severe delays. time for the weather. good morning. another warm day of weather ahead. temperatures not as warm as yesterday. more in the way of cloud. sunny spells for a time. a very mild start to the day. lots of sunshine through the morning.
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into the afternoon, more cloud developing from the west. a few spots of rain. a weak cold front coming through. it won't amount to anything at all. as we go through the evening, more fresh. temperatures through the day, 24—26, possibly. sunshine around this evening. the sun will set at 9:20. more comfortable for sleeping during the night. it will be fresh. 13-14. tomorrow, again, set to stay dry. perhaps a little bit more cloud around. more like sunny spells through the day. temperatures quite high, 23—24. and they are set to climb again through the weekend. in fact, it will feel very warm, even hot. 28—30 on saturday and on sunday. before we go, a number to call if you are worried about loved ones. 0800 0961233. that is for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. bye for now. good morning.
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welcome back to west london. we are in the shadow of the grenfell tower. it isa in the shadow of the grenfell tower. it is a sobering moment to see it in broad daylight. you get a sense of the scale of the damage done by that devastating fire. if you look closely this morning we can see the smoke which is still coming from the fourth or fifth floor. you could see late last night the flames were clearly visible and this morning we can see some smoke emerging from the building. the charred remains really are very building. the charred remains really are very shocking. of course the questions this morning are over finding the people who are still missing and unaccounted for. let me ta ke missing and unaccounted for. let me take you through the basic information at this point: police have confirmed 12 people dead so far, but that figure is expected to rise significantly.
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in terms of those getting injured: 34 patients remain in hospital and 18 are in critical care. lots of people who live in the g re nfell tower lots of people who live in the grenfell tower have been looked after locally. in terms of the issues raised, many people here have an increasing sense of anger as people have shown, compassion to those who need help, but also a sense of anger about why this happened with many questions asked about the fire and safety precautions that were or were not in place and earlier on the programme we spoke with sir david amis, chair of the all party and andreev fire safety rescue group, who said the focus now is on those families. at the moment i don't want to make matters worse as far as the families are concerned. i think we have to wait until there is a full investigation and do all that we possibly can to support the families
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who are now in absolute despair and still looking for their loved ones. yes, and on the issue of help for those who are here, when we arrived in the morning many people were in the area telling us that lots of water, food, bedding and clothing has been dropped off locally during the night. so much that there are piles waiting to be distributed. as you walk around this busy residential area you can see signs on the wall that said, please, help yourself, there is water if needed. it has been a real feature that has been growing over the last 34 hours of people who have come to help out. let's hear what people have had to say. when something as horrific as this happens, you either feel despair and hopelessness or you rise above with optimism and a sense of community to come together and support each other. that has been personified here by the community. they have really come out for each other notjust by donating what they have in their homes in terms of food and clothing
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but also being here for the community to provide the moral support, even spiritual support. we are here to provide aid, tackling food security and providing help with provisions, blankets and essential resources to support communities that so desperately need the support. me and my son went through the whole house, clothes, trainers, shoes, pyjamas, anything i could find that i don't need that sits there i have bagged up and brought down. in terms of the ongoing operation in the building itself, we know from fire officers last night that they we re fire officers last night that they were still operating late into the night last night trying to search the building. they did say at that point they had searched most of the building. we will get an update from the fire service in the next half an hour. that is coming up. right now i will hand you back to the studio. thank you very much. and as the update comes through, we will keep you updated.
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the met police has set up an emergency number for anyone concerned about friends or family. there is other news to bring you: theresa may will meet political parties from northern ireland today at downing street. she'll discuss plans to restore power—sharing at stormont, and try to allay growing concerns about her attempt to secure the backing of the democratic unionist mps in parliament. president trump is being investigated for possible obstruction of justice, according to the washington post. if confirmed, the move by special counsel robert mueller would mark a turning point in the fbi investigation into russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr trump's lawyer has called the leak of information outrageous, inexcusable and illegal. the british government needs to do more to improve the well—being of children, according to unicef. the international charity has produced a report examining whether the world's richest countries are meeting
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internationally—agreed goals for young people. it found that while the uk has made progress dealing with teenage pregnancy and underage drinking, concerns remain over the number of children with poor mental health. we will have the weather in around ten minutes but first it is time to talk about sport and where there are losers, we are feeling the pinch, there are losers — and it wasn't interesting final. it could be pakistan— india for the second time but england were meant to be there. it was all scripted, apparently. what happened? a lot of head scratching, that's for sure. england's cricketers are out of the champions trophy, after a crushing defeat to pakistan in their semi—final. eoin morgan's side had been the favourite for the tournament, but struggled on a slow pitch in cardiff. jonny bairstow, who came into the side, hit 43, but wickets tumbled quickly, including ben stokes, who went for 34, without hitting a single boundary. england made just 211,
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which pakistan knocked off in less than 38 overs. they play either india or bangladesh in sunday's final at the oval. we played against some really good sides recently and we have managed to beat them. that hasn't gone into our heads at all. in today's game, going in knowing we would play on a used cricket brought pakistan's game closer to their home. it was a big challenge and one that was too far for us. southampton are looking for a new manager, after sacking claude puel last night. the frenchman had spentjust one season at st mary's, but during that time guided the saints to the league cup final, where they were narrowly beaten by manchester united, and he helped them to finish a respectable eighth in the premier league. it's been confirmed that the former boxing world champion at five different weights, floyd mayweather, will fight the ultimate fighting lightweight champion conor mcgregor. they will meet in a bout in las vegas on the 26th of august. 40—year—old mayweather retired undefeated after winning his 49th straight bout in september 2015, while the 29—year—old irishman mcgregor is the first fighter in the ufc to have held two belts but has never boxed professionally.
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the contest will take place under normal boxing rules so mcgregor will have to limit himself to the noble art ofjust punching. the us open golf gets under way in wisconsin this afternoon. much of the pre—tournament talk has been about the punishing rough, with long grass surrounding many of the fairways. organisers took the unusual step of cutting some of it back, much to rory mcilroy‘s surprise. and this was lee westwood on one of his practice rounds retrieving his ball from that rough. just off the edge of the fairway... i found it! laughter demonstrating in his own way how long the rough is but rory mcilroy said that if the players can't keep it on the fairway then they are not good enough to be there. the length of the grass doesn't matter. and when you see
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them hit the ball and what they are training to do — hitting straight? could you hit the ball at a grass that high? could i? you wouldjust ta ke that high? could i? you wouldjust take the shot. i would get lost in the grass. we couldn't see over it! thank you. tim farron announced he would be stepping down less than a week after the election. there has been criticism of tim farron's inability to appeal to white voters. the share of the vote fell. in a statement, he said continued scrutiny of his religious beliefs had been a distraction, obscuring his party's message. there are christians in politics who ta ke there are christians in politics who take the view that they should impose the tenets of their faith on society. i have not taken that approach because i fundamentally disagree with it. it is not liberal and, actually, counter—productive
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when it comes to advancing the gospel when it comes to advancing the gospel. even so i seem to have been the subject of suspicion because of what i believe and who my faith is in. in this case we are kidding ourselves if we think we yet live in a tolerant, liberal society. and thatis a tolerant, liberal society. and that is why i have chosen to step down as leader of the liberal democrats. so what's next for the party? alistair carmichael is a lib dem mp and former secretary of state for scotland. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc breakfast this morning. good morning. did he make the right decision in stepping down?|j morning. did he make the right decision in stepping down? i think he did. if you are not a comfortable in doing thejob, if you he did. if you are not a comfortable in doing the job, if you feel that you are being somehow distracted from doing it, as a modern party leader i think you just can't really allow that. let's not distract attention away from the fact that in less tha n attention away from the fact that in less than two years tim farron presided over a quite remarkable revival in the party's fortunes. we have doubled the party membership, we have increased the number of mps
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at the general election by 50%, and he has taken us from the political margin again write to the centre of political debate and he has given us political debate and he has given us political relevance. yet it has cast doubt on his appointment as leader in the first place. when picking a leader of a political party, how much consideration should be given to his faith? he has said it has clashed and distracted from his politicaljob. i think there are legitimate questions for us all to be asking not just legitimate questions for us all to be asking notjust in the lib dems about the way in which his faith has been treated in this general election campaign. i have campaign in every general election since 1979. i can never remember questions of theology acquiring this prominence. when we are electing people to parliament, parliament decides what is legal. the general assembly, the synod of the church of england will decide what is in full, and that is a distinction we would
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do well to remember. -- sinful. it is acceptable for a leader to personally believe something is sinful and then extol that it is not sinful and then extol that it is not sinful in front of the electorate in order to gain votes? tim farron's record on equality issues is absolutely impeccable. there is nothing in his voting record in parliament or indeed in his wider conduct in public life which would contradict that. he has never demonstrated bigotry in any way, shape orform. demonstrated bigotry in any way, shape or form. as demonstrated bigotry in any way, shape orform. as a member of parliament and public figure, that should be enough. it is quite remarkable that he faced these questions time after time after time while others in public life who also claimed to be christians did not have to face these questions. i think there are some serious questions for the way that the media in particular have treated tim farron and his religious beliefs. let me give you a couple of example is of comments we have had from
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viewers this morning on social media. jay said funny how we thought lying to attract votes was ok and even more interesting how he is doing this now rather than before the election result. jerome cousin is asa the election result. jerome cousin is as a gay man i couldn't vote lib dem because it was obvious tim farron was completed. politics and religion need to be separate. picking up on the point, the timing of the announcement has been in some ways quite peculiar. was he pushed? no, he wasn't. i was at the meeting of the parliamentary party yesterday afternoon when he made the announcement i think while all lib dem colleagues were in at the time and we were all surprised. he caught us and we were all surprised. he caught us cold but there was nothing but support for him in the room. there are ten lib dem mps. know, 11 of us. 12, including yourself. who should be the next leader in your opinion?
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joe swinson served as deputy leader, sir vince cable, the voice of experience, ed davey, norman lamb, who are you going for?|j experience, ed davey, norman lamb, who are you going for? i will have that conversation with my colleagues in the next couple of days, but you are right to highlight that although we are very are right to highlight that although we are very small as a parliamentary party, we have some of the biggest hitters in parliament amongst the 12 and we are exceptionally fortunate that the richness of the trees that we have. that is something for which the party should take into regiment in future. thank you very much for your time this morning. the weather. good morning. a monkey and warm start to the day for many of us. —— muggy. through the day, things will feel more fresh. plenty
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of sunshine. a few showers as well. through the day, a cold front will go west to east, opening the door for the fresh air to come in from the west. this cloud and drizzly rain will fizzle out as it goes east towards east anglia. the south—west later on. showers in scotland and northern ireland. further south across the country, dry through the day. the south—west of england, not as hot. 17—18. the south—east, warm and muggy for the first part of the day. 24 degrees. fresh during the afternoon when the front goes east. cloudy in the midlands and northern england. spells of sunshine. isolated showers. more showers in scotland. equally, dry and bright weather in between. if you catch one of those showers, quite sharp and
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heavy. the odd rumble of thunder. windy with showers in northern ireland that the temperatures there in the mid—to—high teens. sunshine and a few showers in the north of wales in north—west england. showers to the north tends to fade away through the overnight period. the early hours friday. most places will dry. crash. 12— 30 degrees. —— fresh. five degrees cooler than today. cloud in the west of the country. rain for northern ireland pushing the scotland. further south, dry once again. in the sunshine, a pleasa nt dry once again. in the sunshine, a pleasant day. temperatures between 15 in glasgow to 17 in london. high pressure will stick around into the weekend. it will keep weather fronts at bay. a weather front of the north—west. saturday, wet and windy weather across the far north west of scotland. for the rest of the
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country, a dry and warm day. 28 degrees towards the south—east. it will feel quite hot. sunday. warming up will feel quite hot. sunday. warming up even will feel quite hot. sunday. warming up even more. will feel quite hot. sunday. warming up even more. by sunday afternoon, temperatures up to 30 degrees. slightly cooler with outbreaks of rain in the far north—west of scotland. looking like a hot weekend to come. temperatures will rise into the new week. back to you, charlie. this is west london. those blue skies contrasting to the image behind me. a shocking image. broad daylight. some smoke still emerging from what looks like the lower floors. the charred remains of the tower block itself. several things emerging this morning. one is the help and compassion of people. so many people rallying around to help out those caught in this crisis. the other thing emerging is those
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messages. it is those missing and unaccounted for at the moment in that desperate situation people are in at the moment as people try to locate loved ones. you can see the tribute wall, a remembrance wall, just around the corner. messages for individuals who people know have been killed. there are other m essa g es of been killed. there are other messages of support. it is moving standing there and people are adding m essa g es standing there and people are adding messages this morning. now for the practical matters. this is a chartered surveyor. good morning. good morning. first of all, there are so many questions to do with how the fire spread so quickly. can you give us initial thoughts? first the fire spread so quickly. can you give us initialthoughts? first of all, you think about the people and then the reasons behind it. how and
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why did it start? how did it spread so quickly? what was the influence of the refurbishment? more importantly, what can we learn from it and how quickly can we do it? already on the programme this morning, many people are asking questions about accidents like this that have happened before to be i called it an accident, but people have said it is avoidable. people said that recommendations after southwark in 2009 were not implemented. the reason is because things like this don't happen often. it is not something to be celebrated. was it the combination of circumstances that led to this? we need to find a quickly. anyone who knows this area well, you look around and have the charred remains
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ofa around and have the charred remains of a tower block. move the camera around to our right. you can see that building is replicated. there are two in shot. in many centres in the uk, there are tower blocks similarto the uk, there are tower blocks similar to this. how can anyone in those buildings have confidence in the building they are living in bearing in mind what has happened here? sadly, when something like this happens, people look up procedures affecting their rome buildings. they can be more modest. —— their own. they can think about what would happen if, tragically, similar circumstances arose. that is a good thing in a way. we look at those things differently than we did before and try to learn quickly from those mistakes. in terms of being official, we know groups living here had raised fears over a long period of time and say they were not listened to. do you think this time
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around that issues will be addressed properly? because the concern is when a report comes out, people will read it but nothing will change. the idea of a fire in buildings like this is if it starts in one building, it should stay that, and it should be that it does not spread elsewhere so fatalities are kept to a minimum. that is the first point. of course, the balding work has been donein of course, the balding work has been done in the design of the building and whether it is appropriate given what has happened in the future. —— building. thank you very much. we will be back you through the morning. it is worth saying just after eight o'clock we will speak to the fire service for any updates they have captured his and the situation with the building itself.
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—— they have on this and the situation. the days of bringing back a massive mobile bill from a european holiday should now be over. from today roaming charges are being dropped across the eu. steph's got the details. new rules come into force today which mean if you travel to an eu country and use your mobile phone you'll be charged the same as if you were here in the uk. so you won't be hit with extra charges for making calls, sending texts or using data on line as long as it's in your plan. these new rules have been a long time in the making, after years of complaints that customers have been getting ripped off by extra charges. hannah maundrell is the editor in chief of the comparison website, money.co.uk. she is with us now. good morning. this is great news for people using mobiles abroad. it is such a pain when you get back and realise you have been charged for so many things he did not realise were going to be added to your bill. what are the caveats ? added to your bill. what are the caveats? this is good for people going to the eu this summer that the we have seen costs spiral everywhere
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else. it means you will not be charged extra in the eu, iceland, norway, etc. but you do need to remember that it is not free calls. it is the same usage you get back home. if you go over the allowance in your contract, you will be charged more. if you are on an unlimited data deal, it could be tapped overseas. if you are on a cheap deal that is less than £3 a gig. cheap deal that is less than £3 a gig, it could be different. it only applies to 28 eu countries and a few others. look at turkey, a rocca, the usa, anywhere else, first, because you could be stung by bills that are not included. —— morocco. you could be stung by bills that are not included. -- morocco. people are asking what will happen if we leave
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the eu? without a crystal ball, we do not know. it will be up for discussion. it will not be top of the negotiation table. it is possible a new arrangement could be agreed. we don't know at this stage. what we do know is that they will apply until we leave the eu. if you are holidaying in the eu, you can enjoy it. could it mean you can get a deal with a spanish provider if they are cheaper and use it here like a normal phone? if only that was the case. you need to use your phonein was the case. you need to use your phone in your home country. if you use it more here, then that is the network. if you use it more overseas, the network would find out. they will monitor it. you need to keep an eye on it that be the same said if you are travelling for
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a longer period. —— on it. you need to keep a look at that. thank you very much. that is it for me for now. we will keep you updated on the events following the tragic fire in west london at grenfell tower. charlie is bringing you the latest. it is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. the search continues this morning for the many londoners who are still missing following a devastating fire at the grenfell tower in kensington. 12 people are known to have died, but the death toll is expected to rise. dozens of families have spent the night sleeping in temporary accommodation or shelters— some who were evacuated from neighbouring properties. many left their homes with nothing. we have more. this is a makeshift
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wall that has been created at the local church. boards are up, there are pens for people here to write m essa g es of are pens for people here to write messages of support. we love you. you will never be forgotten. and some flowers. and here is a picture ofa some flowers. and here is a picture of a missing person on the 19th floor of the tower. people are concerned about people who are still missing from this terrible disaster. well, following the fire, several local councils have launched safety reviews. kensington and chelsea has asked its health and safety advisors to carry out checks on its housing. in enfield, officials say they're arranging a precautionary inspection of all tower blocks. and residents living in high—rise buildings in other parts of london are being reminded of what to do in the event of a fire. g re nfell
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grenfell road and surrounding roads all closed in the area. the road in blackheath down to one road. heathrow airport, terminals three and five, you may need to fly without baggage. something is wrong without baggage. something is wrong with their baggage system. severe delays on the northern line. good morning. another warm day of weather ahead. temperatures not as warm as yesterday. more in the way of cloud. sunny spells for a time. a very mild start to the day. lots of sunshine through the morning. into the afternoon, more cloud developing from the west. a few spots of rain. a weak cold front coming through. it won't amount to anything at all. as we go through the evening, more fresh. temperatures through the day, 24—26, possibly. sunshine around this evening. the sun will set at 9:20. more comfortable for sleeping during the night. it will be fresh.
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13-14. tomorrow, again, set to stay dry. perhaps a little bit more cloud around. more like sunny spells through the day. temperatures quite high, 23—24. and they are set to climb again through the weekend. in fact, it will feel very warm, even hot. 28—30 on saturday and on sunday. before we go, a number to call if you are worried about loved ones. 0800 0961233. that is for those affected by the grenfell tower fire. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt in west london. the desperate search continues to find the missing after the london tower block fire. over 24 hours on from the blaze, 12 people are known to have died. scores more
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are still unaccounted for. we don't know if they're alive or dead, or if they're in hospital or not, we have not any clues. the prime minister promises a full investigation into the causes of the blaze. on the ground, there's anger that warnings may have been ignored. people trapped in that tower, knowing that the people that were supposed to look after them didn't care about them. many spent the night in emergency shelters, as the community pulls together to support people left without homes and basic needs. good morning, it's thursday 15th june. on breakfast today, we'll bring you the latest on the fire, and we'll be asking how a tragedy like this could have struck
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in the heart of the capital. also this morning, liberal democrat leader tim farron steps down from the post saying he's torn between his christian faith and his political duties. the days of coming home to a big mobile bill after a european holiday should now be over. from today, roaming charges are being dropped across the eu. i'll have all the details shortly. in sport, england's hopes of winning the champions trophy are over. eoin morgan's men were favourites to win the tournament, but they were thrashed by pakistan in their semifinal in cardiff by eight wickets. and sarah has the weather. good morning, a muddy start, but things will feel fresh and through the day, a mix of sunshine and showers, all the details for you in about 15 minutes. good morning, i'm in west london, more than 24 hours after fire swept through the grenfell tower behind me, you can still see smoke rising from the building and the fire services at work around the remains.
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late last night, you may have seen the images against the dark night sky, you could see flames inside. but it really is a devastating, sobering sight this morning, the smouldering carcass of the building itself. let's bring you up to date with the latest we have in terms of information on fatalities and casualties. police have confirmed that 12 people are dead, but they have also said that figure is expected to rise significantly. 34 patients, in all, remain in hospital. of those, 18 are in critical care. we will be speaking to the fire service in the next ten minutes or so here on breakfast to get the very latest information for you. locally, hundreds of families are without homes because of the building fire, and many people have
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been helping out, bringing produce, bringing water and blankets for those in need. let's get the very latest now from andy moore. the official death toll is expected to rise, but even so it is outstripped by the number of the missing. these are some of their faces — whole families are unaccounted for, many of them lived on the top floors. this woman was searching local hospitals for herfriend and three children. we don't know if there are alive or dead, or if they're in hospital or not, we have not any clues, just waiting and hoping. as dusk fell, nearly 18 hours after the blaze started, there were still pockets of fire inside the tower block. the prime minister promised there would be a full inquiry into why so many lives were lost. of course, once the scene is secure, once the recovery is complete, then an investigation will take place into the cause of the fire and if there are any lessons to be learned. oh, my god, they're screaming! witnesses say the fire
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spread rapidly, apparently through the new cladding on the outside of the block, installed only last year. this fire expert showed how the foam insulation used in some cladding can catch fire. the actual rigid—board insulation that i believe is most likely to have been used is made from the same material, polyurethane. i'm now setting fire to this, and this is the rate at which it burns. that is very, very rapid, and this is a typical material used for insulating external buildings. the firm that carried out the refurbishment said it had met all building control, fire regulation, and health and safety standards. a later statement removed a section about meeting fire regulations. the government is sufficiently worried to order checks on any tower blocks that have undergone a similar refurbishment. some residents of grenfell tower had to resort to ropes made of blankets and sheets
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to escape the burning building. there are many questions to be answered. why was there no sprinkler system? did the alarms work? is the stay—put policy the right advice? there are 4000 tower blocks in the uk. this terrible fire will cause a fundamental rethink about the safety of high—rise living. andy moore, bbc news. andy is with me now, you have spent 30 hours here, in your hand, and i made reference to this, there are lots of these pieces, it is like charcoal, isn't it? yes, you saw in my report what happens when the lightweight insulating foam is satellite, you apply some heat, and thenit satellite, you apply some heat, and then it does burn, and this is that lightweight insulating foam. it has
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blown on the wind from the tower behind us, this is the cladding that is being blamed for the spread of the fire. and that is just is being blamed for the spread of the fire. and that isjust flaking away. it looks quite solid, but it just breaks up, doesn't it? this is lightweight insulating material. the problem is, this cladding material may be fire resistant, but it is charred all the way through, it does catch light, and this is the sort of material that is on dozens of high—rises here in the uk, hundreds if not thousands around the world, and we have seen how it can burn, how it can transmit the fire. what is going to happen to this foam now on these buildings? is it going to have to be removed? are those buildings safe to live in? we had a wake—up call with buildings safe to live in? we had a wa ke—up call with the buildings safe to live in? we had a wake—up call with the lakmal house fire some years ago, 2009 in south london, when cladding like this was blamed for the spread of the fire. —— lakanal house. six people died, it seemed that we did not learn the lesson. but we claim this will be a
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sea change in our attitude to this sort of cladding, this insulating foam. of two sides to this story, the practicalities that you were talking about, the people here and the desperate search for those who are unaccounted for. i know you have been spending time with some of the families were homeless because of the fire. that is right, and the search for the missing goes on. only this morning i saw a poster placed on the windscreen of a car, an appealfor information on the windscreen of a car, an appeal for information about a 19—year—old girl that was missing. lots of people are searching hospitals for information about loved ones. we do not know the numbers, but it seems perhaps dozens of people are missing, whole families, as i said in my report, families, as i said in my report, families of six, families of five, three generations of the same family, all missing, unaccounted for. many of them, sadly, were on the top floors of the building. the
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firefighters are in there, trying to search through the building, but we have heard it will be a very long and complicated process. as andy was saying, we are getting some updates from the fire service, saying they thought they had searched most of the building. it is worth saying, in a round about five minutes also, we will be speaking live to the fire service to get the very latest update on the situation. for the moment, from west london, back to the studio. more from charlie to come. let's get some reaction from westminster on the tragic events in west london. our political correspondent chris masonjoins us. morning, chris mason joins us. chris. morning, chris masonjoins us. chris. earlier we morning, chris mason joins us. chris. earlier we spoke to the morning, chris. earlier we spoke to the chairman of the all—party fire rescue group, he said meetings would be taking place to look into the safety aspects of this, and this is why labour is calling for an urgent look at the safety precautions and whitemoor was not done. yes, he made it very clear that his view is that the government ought to
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have done more in the past. the current government, the previous one as well, particularly with the installation of sprinklers in older buildings, where they were not put in when it was built. there are searching questions for the government coming from that committee and elsewhere, from former seniorfire officer is, for instance, saying that the desire to cut back on regulation, in their view, has perhaps stood in the way of refreshing the necessary rules around fire safety in tower blocks. particular questions coming the way of gavin barwell. he was a housing minister untiljust last week, of gavin barwell. he was a housing minister until just last week, then he lost his seat, and within hours he lost his seat, and within hours he was appointed as the prime minister's chief of staff. there are questions as to whether a review that the government promised in fire safety regulations has been anyway repressed all sat on by the government. it insists it has not,
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that the work to do with those regulations is ongoing, but you can imagine those questions will continue now, given what happened yesterday. of course, our thoughts are with the fire, but politics continues — after maybe a brief pause because of recent tragic events, we had theresa may negotiating with the dup, and i wonder how surprisingly resignation is. yes, very striking, isn't it, that fought the third time in just a few weeks, politics causing almost yesterday because of the tower block fire? politicians yet again reflecting on the incredible work of the emergency services. a couple of big things still going on politically, the government trying to stitch together a with the democratic unionist party, to try to ensure they have a majority of the conservatives plus the dup, and the prime minister inviting in five political parties from northern
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ireland, one after another today, all part of the attempt to restore devolved government to northern ireland. some are concerned with this idea of the conservatives and the dup working together, suggesting that the government in westminster would not be able to be impartial as far as northern ireland is concerned. and the tim farron, leader of the liberal democrats, is resigning, stepping down in about a month's time. you remember he got all those awkward questions during the election campaign about how he squared his christianity with leading a party with the word liberal in the title, questions about gay sex and whether he thought it was a sin. the liberal democrats made some progress at the general election in terms of seats, but not a vast amount, and he has decided he cannot square leadership with these religious convictions, so we will step down in the summer, and there will be a leadership race. ok, chris, thank you very much for the moment. chris mason there. president trump is being investigated for possible obstruction ofjustice, according to the washington post.
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if confirmed, the move by special counsel robert mueller would mark a turning point in the fbi investigation into russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr trump's lawyer has called the leak of information "outrageous, inexcusable and illegal." there's good news for mobile phone users. a european union law to abolish roaming charges for people using mobile phones abroad comes into force today. the new rules mean that citizens travelling within the eu will be able to call, text and browse the internet on mobile devices at the same price they pay at home. but consumer group which warns phone users could face unexpected charges if they exceed their plan allowances. the new rules mean citizens travelling within the eu will be able to call, text and browse the internet at the same price they do at home. it isa it is a big day for all consumers across europe, and mobile operators as well. essentially, in simple terms, the mobile operators have been told they are not allowed to charge any extra when their
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customers travel to eu destinations. there is a little bit of confusion in terms of what is included. the time now is 30 minutes past eight, that brings you date with the main news, but our main focus is the aftermath of the tragic fire at g re nfell tower aftermath of the tragic fire at grenfell tower in west london which has already claimed 12 lives, many people critically ill in hospital, and still many people missing as well. charlie is in west london for us, outside the tower, taking stock, as questions are now asked about safety. charlie. it is very sobering in the bright sunshine of a thursday morning, looking at the wrecked carcass of the building here. i think if you look at some of the images we are seeing this morning, what has become apparent today is that there is still some smoke emerging from the building. it would appear to be from
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the lower levels of the building. and you can see the black and carcass of the building itself, this morning very much the focus is on those missing and still unaccounted for. so many people we have spoken to on the ground have been coming up to on the ground have been coming up to us, talking about those people who have yet to be accounted for. we know the police have confirmed that 12 people have died so far, but it is also clear, they have made a very clear, that they expect that number to rise. we are going to get the latest from the fire service now, we can speak to dany cotton, the commissioner of the london fire brigade, thank you for your time at this busy time, can you update us with the latest information you have? still some smoke coming from the building as you can see behind me, due to the fact that on the upper floors, some very small pockets of fire remaining. due to the nature of the building at the moment, we are
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not sending firefighters in there because it is not structurally, you know, safe for them to go to the edges of the building. while we have been doing over night watching briefs and firefighting from inside the central part of the building, we do not want to put any firefighters at risk. there will still be some smoke coming from the building. the plan going forward for today is, along with structural layers and the local authority, i have my urban search and rescue team coming down to make an assessment of the building. to look at ways that we can shore up the building, to enable us, and the police and dvi to continue the search. 24 residential floors, how many of those have your office has been able to search so far? we have been able to do a very brief search of all floors, we have been up as far as the 24th floor. that has not extended up to the wider area of all the floors, due to
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the severity of the fire and all the fire debris spread across the floors, it will be a difficult and painstaking process to search through systematically. there is still a number of flaws which will require a thorough search for us to be able to make sure there are no further people involved in this fire. —— a number of flaws. but we anticipate there may be people involved in the upper floors. anticipate there may be people involved in the upperfloors. —— anticipate there may be people involved in the upper floors. —— a number of floors. tell us a little more about that, many people still so concerned about those missing and unaccounted for, what information you getting from offices inside the building? inside the building obviously, terribly difficult, it is very difficult for people to comprehend, when they look at a building, while we cannot go in there and see it. obviously, due to there and see it. obviously, due to the severity of the fire and what happens in those circumstances, everything inside all of those rooms basically ends up on the floor, in large amounts of volume of staff.
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combined with the amount of water in there, it becomes very difficult for officers to get in there, in order to do officers to get in there, in order todoa officers to get in there, in order to do a systematic and proper search we need to make it safe so that a number of officers can go in there and go through it. we are aware there are people unaccounted for, obviously family and friends who are very distressed and need to know the whereabouts of their loved ones. we are doing everything we can to work as hard as we can with police and other colleagues to make that happen. can you tell us a little more about the immediate aftermath, when officers first arrived, what we re when officers first arrived, what were they able to do at that stage, which levels were they able to reach? very early on in the fire, my firefighters, battled through intense heat, to reach some of the very high floors, i spoke with the crew last night, the 20th floor, they had got that far, looking for people. we specifically targeted flats where we were getting calls where we knew where people work. as the commission of the london fire
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brigade, i have to say it was a stressful a nd brigade, i have to say it was a stressful and difficult time, i was looking at a building engulfed in fire, i knew that members of the public were still trapped, i was committing hundreds of firefighters into a committing hundreds of firefighters intoa building committing hundreds of firefighters into a building that to a lot of people looked terribly unsafe. my firefighters were desperate to get in there and desperate to rescue people and we committed crew after crew into a very dangerous, very hot and dangerous situation, as we have and dangerous situation, as we have a passion to do as much as we could to rescue people in there. very challenging, difficult and traumatic event for everyone involved. have any of your officers been injured? we had minor injuries yesterday, up to nine of my firefighters suffered minor burns, heat exhaustion, due to the intensity in the building, and the intensity in the building, and the hard work, and some slips and trips. there was debris falling everywhere. i'm more concerned longer term about the mental impact ona longer term about the mental impact on a lot of people who were here,
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because this event was unprecedented and people saw and heard things on a scale they had never seen before. going forward, one of my main concerns for firefighters is about mental well—being and doing trauma ca re mental well—being and doing trauma care and counselling for them.|j understand the point you made about the difficult circumstances the officers are working in. the figure officers are working in. the figure of those confirmed dead, the police figure, so far, 12 confirmed dead, they have warned they expect that figure to rise significantly. what more can you add to that? u nfortu nately, more can you add to that? unfortunately, this is the awful thing for the people involved, we are unaware of how may people are in the building, as you can appreciate, this is a very large building with a large number of people in there. some people may have lived alone, we are not sure if they are in there way with friends and family. people who were reported missing who subsequently may have been with rest centres and hospitals. we are com pletely centres and hospitals. we are completely unaware of, we can only work with numbers in the local authority and police who seem to be
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missing. as soon as we can, we will go into the building and do the painstaking fingertip search in conjunction with the police and the tvi. -- dvi. investigations will be ongoing but locally, we are speaking with so many people who are asking questions about why the fire spread so quickly, what can you tell us so far, from what you have seen? what i can tell you in my professional capacity is that i have never seen a fire like this in my career, the fire like this in my career, the fire spread very quickly, you will appreciate, far too early to speculate about the cause of that. there will be a thorough investigation which the fire brigade will take part in and we will give professional advice too. at this moment in time, i do not want to speculate. we are still in the rescue phase of the operation, trying to identify who's missing, and trying to make sure this building is safe. that is the priority. thank you very much for
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joining us today, london fire brigade commissioner, giving us the latest, da ny brigade commissioner, giving us the latest, dany cotton. talking about the building and the work of her officers. we will be here in west london throughout the remainder of the programme. take a breakfrom events here, we will look at the weather. warm humid start to the day for many of us but as we had through the day, things turning fresher, a day of sunny spells and scattered showers. the fresher air is drawn in behind a cold front working in from the atlantic. very weak frontal system. ringing cloud and drizzle across many parts of the country. midlands, further south, rain petering out, a band of cloud heading east, find that, from the west, fresher air moving in, bringing showers, particularly from northern ireland and scotland, much of england and
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wales stays dry through into the afternoon. plenty of sunshine across evan and cornwall, temperatures 17, 18 degrees. across the south—east of england and east anglia, 23, 20 4 degrees, early on, before things turn fresher, after the cold front through the afternoon. patchy cloud through the afternoon. patchy cloud through the afternoon. patchy cloud through the midlands, if you showers cropping up, more in the way of showers across parts of scotland. some sunshine in between the showers but if you catch one, could be heavy, potentially the odd rumble of thunder mixed in as well. some is sharp showers across northern ireland, sharp wind in and around the shower, and the odd shower across wales, but much of it stays dry, and in the sunshine a pleasant enough day. through the course of the evening and overnight, most showers ease away in the north, largely dry, cloudy, drizzly rain. temperatures will be lower than they we re temperatures will be lower than they were last night, 12 to 13 degrees, quite sticky and quite muddy
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overnight. through the day tomorrow, outbreaks of rain initially for northern ireland, creeping in across parts of scotland and northern ireland, for the rest of the uk, a dry day. more cloud than there has been, but in the sunshine, towards the south, 23, 20 4 degrees. high pressure really drives the weather as we move through friday night, on into the weekend as well. weather front lingering in the far north—west, high—pressure stopping them progressing across the country. a bit of rain, a bit breezy, in the far north—west, elsewhere, a dry day on saturday, light wind, 28 degrees. -- 23,24 on saturday, light wind, 28 degrees. —— 23,24 degrees. hot on saturday, light wind, 28 degrees. —— 23, 24 degrees. hot weather developing over the weekend, as high as 30 degrees, and a little rain in the north—west. welcome back to west london, in the shadow of what remains of grenfell tower and it is worth taking a moment this morning to look at the
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images, as you look at it now, you can see there is still some smoke emerging from what looks like the lower floors, since the time we have been here, if anything, you would think there is a little more smoke. images late last night in the darkness, you could see fires raging in some parts of the building. but it isa in some parts of the building. but it is a blackened structure now. just hearing from the fire service about the operation ongoing, very difficult circumstances for the officers to work in, clearly, and for local people and for those in the building, desperate situation now, trying to find those missing and unaccounted for. with me now, a man who lived very close. piers thompson lives close by and is helping his friend who managed to escape the blaze. i know that sometimes it sounds cliched but there is a real spirit, it is remarkable how people have rallied around. this has always been
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a strong community, but up against the railway and the motorway, recently the council have unveiled plans to demolish this whole area. so what was already a strong community has come together even more with big public meetings, talking to each other... discussing the issues. i have just talking to each other... discussing the issues. i havejust been speaking with one or two people, almost everyone has a connection with someone who lived in the building, i know that you have people who lived in the building.” would like to thank fire brigade, on the floor, yesterday, they say the friend of —— the life of my friend, he was stumbling around in the dark. —— they saved the life of my friend. one family lives over there, their mum lives there in the tower. the way the town will work, people were in and out of people's flats the whole time, that is one of the problems that people have had, they do not quite know where people were, in the building. but it is a strong community, and we keep having
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external pressures bringing us together. this is the last straw. one of the things i have noticed, in among the awful things happening, does not seem like much but so much debris, around, in your garden near, i noticed it, pieces of charcoal, which experts are telling us are bits of the cladding. they have fallen from the building. that is the insulation. looks like a fake volcano erupted and there is policy director love everywhere. that is obviously terrible. —— and there is polystyrene lava everywhere. we will have a tragic roll of the people, people who did not make it out of the building. —— tragic roll call. this community is going to be devastated. we will leave it there. the search for the missing and unaccounted for continues. we will have more coverage from here in west london a little bit later. now, the news, travel and weather where you are.
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this is business live from bbc news, with ben thompson and sally bundock. doing business after brexit. britain's finance minister will try to reassure business ahead of negotiations to quit the eu. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 15thjune. philip hammond is also expected to use his annual speech to the city of london to guarantee billions of dollars of eu spending on infrastructure projects. also in the programme, the united states raises interest rates to their highest since 2008. with the bank of england meeting today,
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